Which federalist papers discuss the electoral college


which federalist papers discuss the electoral college

form in which the comparison is usually stated to the public: but is it a just form? Here I expect we shall be told that the militia of the country is its natural bulwark, and would be at all times equal to the national defense. A torrent of angry and malignant passions will be let loose. Fortunately it is among the difficulties which, existing only in appearance, vanish on a close and accurate inspection. In order to form an accurate judgment on both of these points, it will be proper to inquire into the purposes which are to be answered by a senate; and in order to ascertain these, it will be necessary to review the inconveniences which. 81 The Judiciary Continued, and the Distribution of the Judicial Authority From Mclean'S Edition, New York. And this tribunal ought to be instituted under the same authority which forms the treaties themselves. May not this defect of an absolute negative be supplied by some qualified connection between this weaker department and the weaker branch of the stronger department, by which the latter may be led to support the constitutional rights of the former, without being too much. I am persuaded that it is the best which our political situation, habits, and opinions will admit, and superior to any the revolution has produced. Throughout the continuance of the council, it was split into two fixed and violent parties. The members of the Congress are rendered ineligible to any civil offices that may be created, or of which the emoluments may be increased, during the term of their election.

Which federalist papers discuss the electoral college
which federalist papers discuss the electoral college

The consequences of this situation were a continual opposition to authority of the sovereign, and frequent wars between the great barons or chief feudatories themselves. But it gives us no specimens of any peculiar advantages derived to the state from the circumstance of the plurality of those magistrates. In fine, the world would have seen, for the first time, a system of government founded on an inversion of the fundamental principles of all government; it would have seen the authority of the whole society every where subordinate to the authority of the parts;. Jenkinson, in ushering into the House of Commons a bill for regulating the temporary intercourse between the two countries, should preface its introduction by a declaration that similar provisions in former bills had been found to answer every purpose to the commerce of Great Britain. She would soon begin, not only to lose confidence in her neighbors, but also to feel a disposition equally unfavorable to them. I speak now with an eye to a magistrate possessing only a common share of firmness. These questions admit of ready answers. To oblige the great body of the yeomanry, and of the other classes of the citizens, to be under arms for the purpose of going through military exercises and evolutions, as often as might be necessary to acquire the degree of perfection which would entitle.

That we may form a correct judgment on this subject, it will be proper to review the several powers conferred on the government of the Union; and that this may be the more conveniently done they may be reduced into different classes as they relate. However proper such reasonings might be to show that a thing ought NOT TO exist, they are wholly to be rejected when they are made use of to prove that it does not exist contrary to the evidence of the fact itself. The common council had the appointment of all the judges and magistrates of the respective cities. Unless we presume at the same time that the powers of the general government will be worse administered than those of the State government, there seems to be no room for the presumption of ill-will, disaffection, or opposition in the people. On the other hand, as men generally derive confidence from their numbers, they might often encourage each other in an act of obduracy, and might be less sensible to the apprehension of suspicion or censure for an injudicious or affected clemency. By increasing the obstacles to success, it discourages attempts to seduce the integrity of either. The number of which this branch of the legislature is to consist, at the outset of the government, will be sixty five.


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